© 2022 M&T Bank and its affiliates and subsidiaries. All rights reserved.
Wilmington Trust is a registered service mark used in connection with various fiduciary and non-fiduciary services offered by certain subsidiaries of M&T Bank Corporation including, but not limited to, Manufacturers & Traders Trust Company (M&T Bank), Wilmington Trust Company (WTC) operating in Delaware only, Wilmington Trust, N.A. (WTNA), Wilmington Trust Investment Advisors, Inc. (WTIA), Wilmington Funds Management Corporation (WFMC), and Wilmington Trust Investment Management, LLC (WTIM). Such services include trustee, custodial, agency, investment management, and other services. Loans, credit cards, retail and business deposits, and other business and personal banking services and products are offered by M&T Bank, Member FDIC.
M&T Bank Corporation’s European subsidiaries (Wilmington Trust (UK) Limited, Wilmington Trust (London) Limited, Wilmington Trust SP Services (London) Limited, Wilmington Trust SP Services (Dublin) Limited, Wilmington Trust SP Services (Frankfurt) GmbH and Wilmington Trust SAS) provide international corporate and institutional services.
WTIA, WFMC, and WTIM are investment advisers registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Registration with the SEC does not imply any level of skill or training. Additional Information about WTIA, WFMC, and WTIM is also available on the SEC's website at adviserinfo.sec.gov. 
Private Banking is the marketing name for an offering of M&T Bank deposit and loan products and services.
M&T Bank  Equal Housing Lender. Bank NMLS #381076. Member FDIC. 
Investment and Insurance Products   • Are NOT Deposits  • Are NOT FDIC Insured  • Are NOT Insured By Any Federal Government Agency  • Have NO Bank Guarantee  • May Go Down In Value  
Investing involves risks and you may incur a profit or a loss. Past performance cannot guarantee future results. This material is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the sale of any financial product or service. It is not designed or intended to provide financial, tax, legal, accounting, or other professional advice since such advice always requires consideration of individual circumstances. There is no assurance the any investment, financial or estate planning strategy will be successful.

Special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs) have been around for decades, but in the spring of 2020, they became an extremely popular alternative route for private companies to go public. The subsequent record-breaking surge in SPAC issuance and merger activity that followed was astounding by all measures and led 2020 to be widely dubbed, “the year of the SPAC.” By 2022, though, the overabundance led many SPACs to struggle to identify compelling targets within their investment timeframe and dozens had issued warnings they could go bust within the year. With investor sentiment souring, the usefulness of SPACs as a part of a legitimate portfolio investment strategy was called into question.

In our view, investing in SPACs may still provide a differentiated return stream depending on risk–return objectives, and is best accessed through a low-risk, consistent return strategy. However, as with any investment, it’s important to understand the key features and complexities before diving in headfirst. In this paper, we break down the basics of the SPAC structure, the reasons behind its sudden rise to prominence and subsequent fall from grace, and review how we believe investors should be thinking about SPACs. First, let’s get the lay of the land.

Please see important disclosures at the end of the article.

Stay Informed

Subscribe

Sign up here to receive insights designed to help you succeed.

Sign Up Now

WTU Newsletter Card
WTU Newsletter Handler